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Glossary: positron emission tomography scan, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota

positron emission tomography scan

(PAH-zih-tron ee-MIH-shun toh-MAH-gruh-fee skan)

A procedure in which a small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein, and a scanner is used to make detailed, computerized pictures of areas inside the body where the glucose is used. Because cancer cells often use more glucose than normal cells, the pictures can be used to find cancer cells in the body. Also called PET scan.

PET (positron emission tomography) scan; drawing shows patient lying on table that slides through the PET machine.

PET (positron emission tomography) scan. The patient lies on a table that slides through the PET machine. The head rest and white strap help the patient lie still. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into the patient's vein, and a scanner makes a picture of where the glucose is being used in the body. Cancer cells show up brighter in the picture because they take up more glucose than normal cells do.

2007-02-27